In Greed We Lust

deamhan:

In the post-enlightenment era of resurrection men and mad anatomists, while the Northern countries focused their energies on mort-safes and fortified tombs, in Italy a sculptor turned his attention to creating an alternative to corpses, anatomy models captured eternally between life and death.
The unmistakably erotic forms of these “Anatomical Venuses” with their pert nipples and languid poses recline on soft pillows, their delicate fingers entangled in their long hair. They are delicate and lifelike wax models of young women, anatomically perfect down to their removable entrails.
Although there were several designers of these anatomy teaching tools, the most famous and beautiful specimens were created by the Florentine sculptor Clemente Susini between 1790 and 1805. His Venuses have delicate, classical features with partially open eyes, and they lie in poses reminiscent of the Renaissance sculptures of his home city. They look almost alive, almost soft. The effect is in equal parts unsettling and strangely comforting, particularly when contrasted to other models showing bodies flayed or decaying plague victims in greenish agony.
Several of Susini’s Venuses have miraculously survived the centuries in remarkably excellent condition.

deamhan:

In the post-enlightenment era of resurrection men and mad anatomists, while the Northern countries focused their energies on mort-safes and fortified tombs, in Italy a sculptor turned his attention to creating an alternative to corpses, anatomy models captured eternally between life and death.

The unmistakably erotic forms of these “Anatomical Venuses” with their pert nipples and languid poses recline on soft pillows, their delicate fingers entangled in their long hair. They are delicate and lifelike wax models of young women, anatomically perfect down to their removable entrails.

Although there were several designers of these anatomy teaching tools, the most famous and beautiful specimens were created by the Florentine sculptor Clemente Susini between 1790 and 1805. His Venuses have delicate, classical features with partially open eyes, and they lie in poses reminiscent of the Renaissance sculptures of his home city. They look almost alive, almost soft. The effect is in equal parts unsettling and strangely comforting, particularly when contrasted to other models showing bodies flayed or decaying plague victims in greenish agony.

Several of Susini’s Venuses have miraculously survived the centuries in remarkably excellent condition.

(via thebakkanekko)